How To Open Source Code In Android Chrome

Android has a phenomenal community that is incredibly involved in the development of mobile devices. We’ve all developed apps, phones, and the platform itself from an early stage and we love to share our knowledge with others. Whether you’re a developer interested in using our Android tools to develop for your own project, or new to coding and want more insight into how everything works beneath the surface, we can show you how in this video tutorial!

Learn how to use open source in Android Chrome , including the basics of modifying an application and getting it built. While an open source project can be built once and used over and over without ever having to change it, each new build brings many changes that are downloaded. Learn how to install the code and diagnose problems from this resource.

Google Chrome

To view the source code of a web page in Google Chrome, use any of the following methods.

View source code only

Method one

To view only the source code, press the shortcut keys Ctrl+U on your computer’s keyboard.

Method two

Right-click a blank part of the web page and select View page source from the pop-up menu that appears.

View page source in Chrome.

View page source with elements

  1. Open Chrome and navigate the web page whose source code you’d like to view.
  2. Click the Customize and control Google Chrome Chrome settings icon icon in the upper-right corner of the browser window.
  3. From the drop-down menu that appears, select More tools, then select Developer tools.
  4. Click the Elements tab in the top-left corner of the new section that appears at the bottom of the screen.
Elements tab in Chrome.

Tip

In Chrome, pressing F12 or Ctrl+Shift+I also brings up the interactive developer tool. This tool provides much more interaction with the source code and CSS settings, allowing users to see how changes in the code affect the web page immediately.

Android Open Source Project

Android is an open source operating system for mobile devices and a corresponding open source project led by Google. This site and the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) repository offer the information and source code needed to create custom variants of the Android OS, port devices and accessories to the Android platform, and ensure devices meet the compatibility requirements that keep the Android ecosystem a healthy and stable environment for millions of users.

As an open source project, Android’s goal is to avoid any central point of failure in which one industry player can restrict or control the innovations of any other player. To that end, Android is a full, production-quality operating system for consumer products, complete with customizable source code that can be ported to nearly any device and public documentation that is available to everyone (in English at source.android.com and in Simplified Chinese at source.android.google.cn).

Just as you can contribute code to AOSP, you can also contribute to AOSP documentation—and we want your input! Android’s flexibility and ever-changing codebase means this site needs your feedback to keep content fresh, accurate, and relevant to Android implementors. We encourage you to check the changelog for details on recent AOSP updates and to report bugs or offer suggestions using the Site Feedback at the bottom of every page.

The magic custom shortcut button

This first secret Chrome setting for Android is probably my favorite — ’cause it’s just so darn useful, no matter how you tend to hop around the web on your phone.

It’s an extra button that gets added into the top of the Android Chrome browser and then gives you extra-easy access to whatever function you use the most: sharing, opening up a new tab, or launching a new web search with only the silky sound of your salamander voice.ADVERTISEMENT

If you really want to get wild, you can even let Chrome analyze your usage for you and turn the button into a dynamic command center where the browser automatically decides which of those buttons is most likely to be useful for you at any given moment and then adjusts itself accordingly.

However you approach it, you’ll save yourself the step of first tapping to open Chrome’s main menu and then clumsily pawing around to find the function you need. And if you use some of these functions as frequently as I do, all those saved seconds can really add up.

So what are you waiting for? To get that extra option in Chrome on your phone this instant:

  • Type chrome:flags into the browser’s address bar.
  • Type the word adaptive into the search box at the top of the screen that comes up.
  • Look for the lines labeled “Adaptive button in top toolbar” and “Adaptive button in top toolbar customization.” Tap the box beneath each of ’em and change its setting to “Enabled.”
  • Tap the Relaunch button at the bottom of the screen.

And that’s it — you did it! (Go ahead and give yourself a quick pat on the back, you audacious explorer.) Once your Android Chrome app restarts itself, you can tap the three-dot menu icon in the browser’s upper-right corner and select “Settings,” then look for the freshly added “Toolbar shortcut” option to configure exactly how your fancy new button will work.

Chrome Android Settings: Button

Make that selection once, then enjoy having the button of your choice a single tap away for all of eternity (or, y’know, until Google mucks around with this again).

Mozilla Firefox

To view the source code of a web page in Mozilla Firefox, use any of the following methods.

View source code only

Method one

To view only the source code, press Ctrl+U on your computer’s keyboard.

Method two

Right-click a blank part of the web page and select View Page Source from the pop-up menu that appears.

View page source in Firefox.

View page source with elements

  1. Open Firefox and navigate the web page whose source code you’d like to view.
  2. Click the Menu Firefox Menu Icon icon in the top-right corner of the screen.
  3. Select Web Developer in the drop-down menu, then select Toggle Tools from the expanded menu.
  4. Click the Inspector tab in the top-left corner of the section that appears at the bottom of the screen.
Firefox Inspector tab.

Tip

In Firefox, pressing F12 or Ctrl+Shift+I also brings up the interactive developer tool. This tool provides interaction with the source code and CSS settings, allowing users to see how changes in the code affect the web page in real time.

View a section of the page’s source code

  1. Highlight the portion of a web page for which you’d like to view the source code.
  2. Right-click that highlighted section and select View Selection Source.

Tip

You can use the Firebug add-on to view and edit the source code of a page, and view the changes live through the browser.

Opera

Fast and great for saving data

REASONS TO BUY

+Data-saver mode+Ad-blocking+Built-in ‘browser VPN’

REASONS TO AVOID

-Interface feels slightly confusing at times

Opera is another mobile browser with a desktop counterpart that boasts all the benefits for users of both versions. 

Opera stands out from the rest of the best Android browsers with a data-saver mode that compresses videos as well as standard web pages. As a result, pages load faster thanks to the reduced data, and if you don’t have one of the best unlimited data plans, you won’t burn through your monthly data allotment as quickly.

Opera also offers a built-in free VPN-like feature that gives you a virtual IP address, although notably, you can’t use both the VPN feature and data-saver mode in tandem. (Technically, the “VPN” is a proxy service for the Opera browser app only. To encrypt other apps’ communications, you’ll need one of the best Android VPN apps.)

Even with its many features, Opera was one of the fastest browsers that I tested, with only Chrome consistently outperforming it. One slight frustration with Opera is its convoluted interface: You may be distracted by the menus at both the top and bottom of the screen.

Opera also offers a few variants of its browser. Opera Mini is focused on the data-saving side of things, while Opera Touch is geared toward a one-handed browsing experience.

A better Chrome widget

Android’s in the midst of a long-awaited widget revival, but one widget that’s remained woefully underwhelming is the weary ol’ widget for Chwome. (Whoops — got carried away there. Sowwy ’bout that.)

Chrome’s widget selection has long consisted of the uninspired options for putting a browser-specific search bar or a bland box showing your bookmarks on your home screen, and that’s it. But now, you can add two far more appealing browser control panels into that mix — if you know how to uncover ’em.

Thankfully, you’re about to: ADVERTISEMENT

  • Once again, type chrome:flags into your browser’s address bar.
  • This time, type widget into the box on the screen that comes up.
  • See the line labeled “Quick Action Search Widget”? Tap the box beneath that bad boy and change its setting to “Enabled.”
  • Go grab yourself a bowl of pretzels and/or cheese poofs. You deserve it.
  • Tap the Relaunch button at the bottom of the screen.

After Chrome restarts, wipe off your snack-encrusted fingies and head back to your home screen. Long-press on any open area to find your device’s widget selector. Find and tap “Chrome” in the list of choices, and you oughta then find yourself facing two snazzy new options for your Android widget-using pleasure:

Chrome Android Settings: Widgets

Conclusion

If you like to hack open source code then you’ll love the latest Chrome Trick which is a neat way to highlight the open source code being used in the browser so you can access it more easily! Just head to chrome://flags/ and enable “Show Open Source” under “Developer Features”

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